Precision Maintenance: Why do it? – Alignment and Balancing Procedures

November 14, 2017

As Published by Maintenance Technology Magazine September 2017 issue

If greater reliability and uptime are of any concern to you, then precision maintenance is a key component in achieving it. This means having clear and simple, yet meaningful, procedures in place for the different tasks involved. Two such tasks are precision alignment and balancing. LUDECA’s  5-Step Procedures will help guide your facility and maintenance staff to achieving precision maintenance.

Get your own copy of these 5-Step Procedures:


Download 5-Step Shaft Alignment Procedure


Download 5-Step Balancing Procedure

Why is precision maintenance so important?  The reasons are clear:

  1. Safety
    The alignment and balancing procedures lay out the basic steps required to align and balance machines safely, reducing risk of injury and increasing likelihood of a quality outcome. Checklists simplify the workflow and serve to remind employees of the processes required to consistently and safely perform the precision maintenance task.
  2. Reliability
    Well-aligned and balanced machines run more reliably, with a greatly reduced probability of failure. This allows for better maintenance planning, greatly reduced repair and maintenance expenses, increased uptime and more profits.
  3. Efficiency
    A good alignment procedure ensure that machines are aligned to the proper tolerances for the running condition of the machines, taking into account such things as thermal growth and anticipated positional changes. This ensures that the greatest efficiency is achieved in your running machinery, prolonging their health and reducing power consumption. Studies have shown that well-aligned machines result in a 3% to 10% reduction in power consumption. Noise and heat generation is reduced, producing a safer work environment.
  4. Production Quality
    Good alignment and balancing result in better product quality since vibration is minimized, resulting in a more uniform and higher product quality. Unexpected breakdowns in production machinery may lead to costly waste from scrappage and high restart costs for the production line.
  5. Training & Procedural Consistency
    Once implemented, a procedure ensures all employees involved in the activity face clear and consistent expectations and processes, leading to a better understanding between all staff in the facility. Training expense can be reduced since often only refresher training is required to update understanding of the technology utilized as updates are rolled out. Records should be kept that document employee training.

The next step in precision maintenance and reliability is the Implementation of formal specifications that detail every step in a task from safety to activity process to documentation, to ensure that anyone involved can follow the procedures and guidelines without confusion, and reach the desired outcome for all machinery types in the plant. Such specifications typically take from two to three months to develop and a further two to three months to roll out and fully implement. LUDECA has written a number of these specifications for customers worldwide. Let us help you as well.

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One Condition Monitoring Technology is Not Enough!

November 7, 2017

Condition Monitoring Expert Tip #4 by Mobius Institute

This tip is sponsored by IMVAC (International Machine Vibration Analysis Conference)

There is no doubt that technologies such as vibration analysis, oil analysis, ultrasound and infrared are very powerful. They can tell you a great deal about fault conditions in rotating machinery, electrical systems, and more. But if the criticality warrants it, you will be in a much stronger position if you have multiple technologies indicating that a fault condition exists rather than relying on just one.

For example, if vibration analysis indicates there is a problem in a gearbox, oil analysis can confirm the fault with the presence of wear particles. In the case of vibration analysis, you can utilize high frequency analysis, spectrum analysis, time waveform analysis, and phase analysis to enable you to validate your diagnosis.

There can be a great deal at stake when you make a diagnostic call on a piece of equipment. More so if it is critical equipment. At the very least, a false diagnosis may lead to equipment failure (if you miss the fault condition) or it can lead to unnecessary work and downtime. What’s more, your reputation is at stake. Sadly, people often forget when you make the right call, but it can take years for people to forget when you make the wrong call.

Thanks Mobius Institute for sharing such valuable information with us!

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How to Keep your CNC Machinery Pit Stops Short

October 31, 2017

Reposted from Easy-Laser®

Efficient manufacturing of today almost always depend on a minimum of downtime. Therefore a spindle crash is a most unwelcome accident. The good thing is that there now are fast methods for checking the machine.

One of the most common things that cause a need for service is spindle crash. And of course this always happens when you really need maximum machine availability! Therefore you want the geometry check of the machine to be as quick as possible. Most technicians would be thrilled to use the Easy-Laser® E940 system for measurement and alignment of the spindle, turret and tailstock back to precise position, because it is so quick to set up on the machine and to use. Here’s how to do:

FIRST CHECK THE STRAIGHTNESS

1. Tailstock Z movement is measured in both horizontal (H) and vertical (V) direction at the same time. 2. Turret movement Z2 is measured.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At first we start to check the straightness of the Z-axis both for tailstock movement and for the turret. Mount the laser transmitter (EHS-unit or D22) in the main spindle and the EHM-unit at the moving part.

If the above measurement is within tolerance, normally 5-10 microns, we can go on with the next measurement.

NEXT STEP, SPINDLE BEARING CHECK

After a crash you want to know the condition of the spindle bearing. Are the bearings still ok, or should they be changed? The E940 includes a vibrometer and software to listen to the bearing following an ISO-standard presentation/documentation, to give you the answer how to proceed with the job.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPINDLE DIRECTION

1. Main spindle to Z-axis (tailstock movement) – analyze the result, which should be within 0.015mm/300mm according to the ISO-standard given from the display unit.
2. Carry on with the main spindle to turret movement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MAIN SPINDLE

Main spindle to tailstock measurement is done by using the EHS-unit and EHM-unit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Main spindle to turret check is normally done by using D22 laser transmitter in the main spindle and EHM-unit at the turret, see below picture:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

START MANUFACTURING AGAIN

In a few hours all measurements and necessary alignment has been performed with full documentation according to ISO-standard. Hopefully no severe damage was found, and production can start immediately. The machine is back on track, and so are you!

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LUDECA announces authorized TM Induction Heating Service and Repair Center for the United States

October 25, 2017

LUDECA is proud to announce that effective October 20,  2017, LUDECA is certified as an authorized TM Induction Heating Service and Repair Center for the United States.

Our factory trained technicians are highly experienced, and committed to providing our customers with excellent service.

We look forward to servicing your TM Induction Heating products at our Doral, Florida location.

For more information, visit our website.

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Criticality Analysis is Critical

October 24, 2017

Condition Monitoring Expert Tip #3 by Mobius Institute

This tip is sponsored by IMVAC (International Machine Vibration Analysis Conference)

How do you decide which assets should be monitored? How do you decide whether you can justify the use of more than one technology? Criticality analysis provides a means to prioritize which assets will be monitored and how much effort will be put in to collecting data and performing the analysis.

Criticality analysis considers several factors. It will consider the consequences of failure, for example health and safety, harm to the environment, downtime and production losses, availability of spares, cost of spares, etc. It will also consider the reliability of the asset; how likely is it to develop a fault condition. And it should also consider the detectability of the fault conditions. Therefore, an unreliable asset where failure would lead to dire consequences and where we currently cannot detect the onset of failure absolutely requires condition monitoring and can justify multiple technologies. At the other extreme, a reliable asset’s minimal consequences of failure may not require any condition monitoring; we may employ “run to failure”.

Criticality analysis enables you to make the best use of your limited resources.

Special thanks to Mobius Institute for allowing us to share this condition monitoring expert tip with you!

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