Could’a – Would’a – Should’a in Facility Maintenance Industry

February 13, 2018

How many facilities only collect vibration data when it doesn’t interfere with other activities? So often collecting and analyzing data is only one part of a given person’s responsibilities and workloads dictate that the collection and/or analysis take a back seat. When this happens, machine problems are not detected and therefore not reported for corrective action to be taken. If a machine then fails management has all the right to ask why the problem was not found and reported, even if management itself is the reason the data was not collected or analyzed! Vibration data collected should also be analyzed in a timely manner (within two business days of collection) to allow for proper scheduling of any needed repairs; of course, if problems are detected while collecting data that are believed to be severe enough to merit immediate attention, then they should be reported immediately to the facility. Many analysts do not know how long it will take to approve, plan, order parts, kit out, and schedule the resources to execute the repair work. Therefore, one must collect, analyze, and report the data as soon as possible. Generally, you may find several problems in most facilities; however, if you hand in 20 or 30 reports to the Reliability contact, they can quickly be overloaded. I would collate and deliver all the necessary reports but would focus on the top 5 priority problems first, based on safety, criticality, severity, and production demand.

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When “Square, Level, Plumb and True” Come Together in Rotating Machinery Installation

February 6, 2018

In rotating equipment installations, there are many tools employed by the concrete pouring team, the baseplate fabricator, the rotating equipment installer, the pipe fitter, the alignment team, etc., to get the job the done as effectively and efficiently as possible. “Square, plumb, level and true” is what allows those teams to work together.  “True”means something is exact or accurate.  In rotating machinery, true can encompass how accurately equipment is aligned, in flatness, straightness, or rotational centerline (coupling) alignment.

Cutting corners in square, plumb, level and true is non-negotiable.  If one team does not hold to this principle, it can cause significant problems for the rest of the teams in the form of delays involved in having to work around and remedy the alignment problem. We’ve heard the stories of machinery installations that have bolt-bound issues, pipes that don’t fit, baseplates that are warped, many resulting in a need for extreme soft-foot corrections.  These are all symptoms of some part of the installation not holding to square, plumb, level and true. When all teams abide by this principle of square, plumb, level and true, the installation will be more efficient, have fewer delays and ensure that no costly rework will be needed to undo incorrect installation.

The building is actually square, plumb and level. It is the parking lot that is not level.



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My Spectrum Does Not Indicate Misalignment so my Machine is Aligned, Right?

January 30, 2018

Condition Monitoring Expert Tip #9 by Mobius Institute

No, sadly, that may not be correct. If the spectrum (and phase readings) indicate misalignment, then the machine will be misaligned. But if there is no indication of misalignment, the machine may still be misaligned. I know that may not make sense, but unfortunately it is true.

A number of experiments have been performed where real machines were misaligned and the vibration pattern did not change. The vibration pattern depended upon the type of coupling and other conditions, but the bottom line is that the only way you can be sure that the machine is precision aligned is to precision align the machine with a laser alignment tool.

We appreciate Mobius Institute for allowing us to share this tip with you!

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Quick Tip to Help Locate Compressed Gas Leaks

January 23, 2018

Using ultrasound to locate compressed gas leaks is relatively easy, but it occasionally it can present some challenges. The reason ultrasound is so successful is that it is a high frequency, short wavelength signal that does not like to penetrate 2nd mediums. While performing compressed gas leak inspections, keep in mind that strong ultrasonic signals can bounce off most materials leading to false indications.

To overcome this challenge, turn your ultrasonic detector 180° and see if the signal is stronger coming from that direction.

Download Find-and-Fix Leaks Procedure


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Why Do I Need to Use Time Waveform Analysis?

January 16, 2018

Condition Monitoring Expert Tip #7 by Mobius Institute

Spectrum analysis provides a great deal of information about the health of rotating machinery. But you should consider the spectrum as a summary of the vibration within the machine.

The Fast Fourier Transform takes the time waveform and computes how much of each frequency is present and displays that as a line in the spectrum (grossly summarized, but that is basically the case). Therefore, if the vibration from the machine is generated by smooth periodic motion, then the spectrum provides a very good representation of what is happening inside the machine. But as damaged gears mesh together, and rolling elements pass over damaged areas on the raceway of the bearing, and as the pump vanes push through the fluid causing turbulence or cavitation, the vibration generated is not smooth and periodic. And there are a lot of other fault conditions that likewise do not generate smooth and periodic vibration. Thus, the only way to really understand what is happening inside the machine is to study the time waveform.

The time waveform is a record of exactly what happened from moment to moment as the shaft turns, the gears mesh, the vanes pass through fluid, and the rolling elements roll around the bearing. Each minute change that results from impacts, rubs, scrapes, rattles, surges, and so much more is recorded in the time waveform and then summarized in the spectrum. Therefore, it is critical to record the time waveform correctly and analyze it when you have any suspicion that a fault condition exists.

Special thanks to Mobius Institute for letting us share this condition monitoring expert tip with you!

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